Schleiflin plan

Still, the details of planning seem to have provided the basis for a pervasive confidence that they could win the war that they believe would happen, and that they could win it quickly. Moltke got rid of the plan because he was sure that the Russian Empire and the United Kingdom would help France and that Italy would not help Germany.

He set his sights on finding a way to invade France, capture Paris and force a French surrender quickly, ideally within two months; after this Germany could turn its full attention to Russia. The French also organised and moved their own troops rapidly.

After the deployment of the entire German army in the west, they would attack through Belgium and Luxembourg, with virtually all the German force. Forcing the French from their frontier fortifications would be a slow and costly process that Schlieffen preferred to avoid by a flanking movement through Luxembourg and Belgium.

Zuber's argument is that the Schlieffen memorandum was a "rough draft" of a plan to attack France in a single front war. These three nations were neutral, lacked sizeable military forces and had borders with France that were largely unprotected.

Belgium had had her neutrality guaranteed by Britain in — so his strategy for success depended on Britain not supporting Belgium. The last group consisted of three cavalry divisions, three infantry corps, two Ersatzkorps, and a reserve corps on the left wing.

German forces would mass against the French invasion force and defeat it in a counter-offensive, while conducting a conventional defence against the Russians.

Ritter wrote that invasion was a means to an end not an end in itself, as did Terence Zuber in and the early s. Later changes reduced the time allowed to the 5th day, which meant that the attacking forces would need to get moving only hours after the mobilisation order had been given.

What was The Schlieffen Plan?

Moltke intended to destroy or capture the remaining resources which the French possessed, against the protests of the German civilian authorities, who after the fall of Paris, negotiated a quick end to the war. Schlieffen concluded that a massive and successful surprise attack against France would be enough to put off Britain becoming involved in a continental war.

About 60 percent of the German army would operate in the west and 40 percent in the east. However, Moltke 's weakening of the German right, the defense of Alsace-Lorraine, and the transfer of three army corps and one cavalry division from the western front to help contain the Russian advance into East Prussia, all contributed to the failure of the German army to break through the Allied forces at the Marne.

The Schlieffen Plan was revised as tension in Europe increased. The Schlieffen Plan was daring but it had a number of glaring weaknesses: The German advance was ultimately halted at the week-long Battle of the Marne September ; their inability to advance further became a major factor in the development of trench warfare and the Western Front.

Mobile heavy artillery could help make up for numerical inferiority against a Franco-Russian coalition and smash fortifications. French knowledge about German intentions might prompt them to retreat to evade an envelopment that could lead to Ermattungskrieg, a war of exhaustion and leave Germany exhausted, even if it did eventually win.

Moltke balked at the weakness of the Alsatian "hinge" region, fearing that the massive strength of the right-wing's hammer would allow the French to breakthrough the relatively sparsely manned left-wing "anvil".

Schlieffen Plan: Schlieffen Plan, battle plan first proposed in by Alfred, Graf (count) von Schlieffen, chief of the German general staff, that was designed to allow Germany to wage a successful two-front war.

The Schlieffen Plan

The plan was heavily modified by Schlieffen’s successor, Helmuth von Moltke, prior to. The Schlieffen Plan was created by General Count Alfred von Schlieffen in December The Schlieffen Plan was the operational plan for a designated attack on France once Russia, in response to international tension, had started to mobilise her forces near the German border.

The Schlieffen Plan was created by General Count Alfred von Schlieffen in December The Schlieffen Plan was the operational plan for a designated attack on France once Russia, in response to international tension, had started to mobilise her forces near the German border.

Introducing the Schlieffen Plan. The Schlieffen Plan was an operational plan used by the Germans to take over France and Belgium and carried out in August It was devised by and named after. The plan was first put to paper at the end of when Schlieffen retired, and was adapted to changing international circumstances by his successor, the younger Helmuth von Moltke.

The underlying principle remained the same until August France to the west, Russia to the east; Germany had a strategic plan in case of war in the early 20th century. A short introductory guide to the Schlieffen plan, its significance to the German war effort, and why it failed.

Schleiflin plan
Rated 3/5 based on 36 review
The Schlieffen Plan